Advertise on the J24 Site

The J24 “Comunity” is gaining momentum and our new site traffic stats are already impressive. We are now offering the opportunity to advertise your business to the J24 community. If you own a J the rates are unbeatable, if you crew or are a commercial operation wanting to advertise your business, then you will find our rates very attractive.

The J24 Community offers a wide range of skills that can benefit other owners and crew. We suggest you make a habit of supporting our advertisers, they are J sailors like you and will offer you the special service you expect from a small community.

In the very near future we will be commencing a promotional campaign on Sail-World.com – the world’s largest sailing news site. This will drive a huge amount of traffic to our site. So if you want to promote your business to our market then now is the time to talk to us about your ad.

Call or email Simon Grain for more details. Ph 03 9568 3666 BH

J24 US Legends Regatta 2003 – by Dave Reed

It’s the opening night of the J/24 Silver Anniversary Regatta in Newport, R.I. One after another, J/24 “legends” take the stage and offer up a story or two. “He loves to tell this one,” someone in the crowd whispers to a friend. On stage is 1984 world champion Dave Curtis, telling the crowd of 600 or so about the time he, Bob and Stu Johnston, and Major Hall spent Block Island Race Week racing and sleeping on the 24-footer, just so the boat’s designer Rod Johnstone could say it comfortably accommodated four live aboards.

Rolph Turnquist, 55, of Hamel, Minn., and John Gjerde, 54, of Delavan, Wis., the longest-running co-owners of a J/24 and founders of Fleet No. 1 (Minnesota’s Lake Minnetonka), follow up with one about the day they went to pick up their first boat from builder Tillotson-Pearson. As they inspected their new ride, hull No. 7, they noticed the stanchions were too small. Says Turnquist: “Everett [Pearson] says, ‘No problem. I’ll be right back.’ He goes and raids the naval shipyard and eventually comes back with a car full of stop and yield signs, saws off the posts and gives us our stanchions. They’re still on the boat today.”

Read more of these ‘can’t take your eyes off’ stories here …

Real short course racing

What Happens When You Do It Differently?

Yellow Jersey Racing in J/105s?

(San Diego, CA- July 18-19)- So what happens when you combine the best aspects of bicycle racing into a format for yacht racing? The SoCal J/105 fleet experienced the sensation last One Design Weekend when the SDYC Race Committee decided to shake things up in honor of the start for Le Tour de France.

Twelve boats came together on an ultra short course, taking a mere four minutes to complete a leg. Combined with the fact that two laps constituted a race and only two minutes between races and there you have the makings for close racing and some very tired crew. As in bike racing, there were not only prizes for winning the race, but intermediate prizes termed “primes” for random accomplishments such as the first to the mark, the fastest timed leg of a race, the fastest start and the ever coveted box of doughnuts to the last finisher of race three (delivered hot and fresh courtesy of the SDYC race committee boat).

In all, eight races were run on the day with the highlight being the last which was run in a “win and out” format. In this race the winner of each leg claimed a prime and retired from the race. The winner of leg one was first, the winner of leg two second and so on until the final sprint for fourth. Rails were scraping, Dacron was stretching and halyards were flying to be the boat to capture the title for the first edition of the Cardiac Cup.   

Overall, Doug Werners’ JAVELIN won the day followed closely by the Driscoll/ Hurlburt combination on TRIPLE PLAY and third went to the ever quick Dennis Case owned WINGS.  Overall the regatta gave a chance for the fleet to learn about the boat and about themselves, ultimately leading to better crew work and faster racing on the course.  Photo Credits: Mark Johnson

 

IJCA Mourns Loss of Geoff Evelyn

July 1, 2009  –  From Eric Faust, Executive Director, J/24 Class Association, as posted on the IJCA site
The International J/24 Class Association is sad to report that past IJCA Chairman and Councilor of Honor, Geoff Evelyn of Canada, passed away Saturday, June 27, 2009, at age 64 after suffering complications from a brain hematoma. Geoff was a long-time supporter of the J/24 Class and volunteered many hours to helping the Class, both as the Chairman and more recently as a Councilor of Honor. Geoff’s spirit and devotion to the sport of sailing will be sadly missed.
Geoff is survived by his wife, Wendy; daughter Jenn, and grandson Curtis Tureck. A memorial service will be held on Thursday, July 2nd. Condolences can be expressed at http://www.courticefuneralchapel.com/obituaries-details.php?id=235 through the link on the right side of the screen.

Many Australian J sailors and those who have held administrative positions or travelled to overseas regattas would know Geoff.  In lieu of flowers, the family has asked that people make a contribution to the charity of their choice. The website also allows you to note your charitable contribution and share that with the family.

Regards,
Eric Faust
Executive Director
J/24 Class Association

I have posted the following condolence on the Chapel site above:

On Behalf of the Australian J24 Class Association and our many members who have over the years had friendship, contact and dealings with Geoff, we would like to send our sincere condolences to his family and friends over the loss of Geoff. We recognise his huge contribution to J/24 International in being one of the key players whose stewardship has made the class what it is today. There is no doubt that his work protected the class from falling into the abyss that so many others have. We know he is sailing smoothly now.

Simon Grain, President, J24 Australia.

Thank you Alyn and Hugo for your help with preparing this message

Welcome!

Welcome to the new site! It’s been given a bit of a revamp, hope you like the changes.

The new design makes it really easy to add new articles and keep things organized, so what we’d love to see is people contributing and commenting on articles. Feel free to have chat about the articles through comments.

Continue reading “Welcome!”